All posts in Iridology

What info do your eyes hold?

Last month I was in Germany. I went because I was excited to learn more about some of the products that I use for my biopuncture treatments. The four full days of training were amazing, but the big surprise for me was that I learned something that I hadn’t anticipated to be as interesting and as useful as it turned out to be.

Dr. Kay Kaemmerer is the naturopath who led most of our training and even invited us to visit his clinic to observe him in action. We watched him use complex diagnostic tools and computer programs, simple observational skills, and in-house laboratory tests. His treatments drew on conventional western medicine techniques (mostly diagnostic), Traditional Chinese Medicine treatments (mostly seven-star needling, cupping, and some acupuncture), homeopathic and homotoxicology treatments, and more.

As I mentioned, however, constitutional iridology is what I focused on learning. It is through close inspection of the iris of the eye that we can see where the body has tendencies toward weaknesses and possible disease. We all know that all of our eyes look different from each others’. But, the differences are so much more noticeable with the use of a magnifying glass. Each eye is like a fingerprint, a blueprint of your own health.

In TCM, I already use pulse and tongue diagnosis as part of my tools in assessment of a person’s health. Constitutional iridology gives me more insight into the possible root causes of current illnesses, as well as a focus on preventative measures that can be taken to avoid weaknesses toward future disease.

Check out these pictures and see just how different the eyes can be! And let me know if you want to learn what your eyes “say” about your health.

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Kidney Support

The kidneys are essential for filtering the blood and removing wastes, which are then eliminated via the urinary bladder. The kidneys also regulate electrolytes, maintain acid-base balance (critical to health and life), and regulate our blood pressure.

Put your hands over your lower back at waist level and say “thank you” to your kidneys! To help support your kidneys:

  1. – Limit your exposure to toxins. Limit alcohol and processed food consumption.
  2. – Look at your medicine cabinet. Are you taking a lot of medication? Every pharmaceutical has side effects and needs to be processed by the liver and kidneys. Do not stop any prescribed drugs without advice from your doctor. But, consider that if you are taking ibuprofen (e.g. Advil) daily or frequently, this is damaging to your kidneys.
  3. – Consider that anything you put on your skin will also be absorbed into your body and, if toxic, will affect your health. Though quantities of chemicals might be low, if used regularly, they can accumulate.
  4. – Look at your household cleansers. Does the bottle have a skull and crossbones on it? Consider that there are alternatives, including simple baking soda, vinegar, and lemon combinations and many healthier packages detergents and cleansers on the market.
  5. – Spend some time away from the city near lots of plants (plants help to clean the air).
  6. – Drink plenty of water through the day as dehydration can also damage the kidneys.
  7. – Foods that support the kidneys include apples, blueberries, raspberries, strawberries, cranberries, cherries, red grapes, cabbage, cauliflower, garlic, onions, red bell peppers, egg whites, fish (sardines, mackerel, herring), olive oil, fresh raw nuts and seeds (walnuts, almonds, pumpkin seeds, sunflower seeds), and legumes.

Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) also associates the Kidney system with other functions in the body, so additionally you could:

  1. – Work on your fears. Are they limiting you? What fears are not serving you?
  2. – Keep your ears healthy. Find silence. Avoid loud sounds (use earplugs when you need to) and do not turn up the volume when you wear headphones.
  3. – Lift weights. Lifting weights does help strengthen muscles, but it also builds stronger bones. Bones are connected to the TCM Kidneys. Manage your stresses. Your adrenal glands sit on top of your kidneys and pump out your stress hormones. When stressed, your adrenals have to work hard to pump out adrenaline and/or cortisol, which can further stress your body.
  4. – Tap lightly on your back, in the muscles to either side of the spine, at the level of the waist to stimulate the Kidney energy.

Acupuncture, Chinese herbs, supplements (ask me about Thuja), and other treatments and lifestyle changes can also help.

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Liver Support

Processing of dandelion at factory in Germany

The function of the liver is to assist with detoxification, digestion, hormone production, metabolism, blood sugar regulation, and storage of blood. We need our livers for survival, but sometimes we aren’t particularly kind to this very important organ.

Put your hand over the lower part of your right ribcage and say “thank you”. Here are some tips for supporting your liver.

  1. – Limit alcohol and processed food consumption.
  2. – Look at your medicine cabinet. Are you taking a lot of medication? Every pharmaceutical has side effects and needs to be processed by the liver. Do not stop any prescribed drugs without advice from your doctor. But, consider that if you are taking acetaminophen (e.g. Tylenol) daily or frequently, this is damaging to your liver.
  3. – Consider that anything you put on your skin will also be absorbed into your body and, if toxic, will affect your health. Though quantities of chemicals might be low, if used regularly, they can accumulate.
  4. – Look at your household cleansers. Does the bottle have a skull and crossbones on it? Consider that there are alternatives, including simple baking soda, vinegar, and lemon combinations and many healthier packages detergents and cleansers on the market.
  5. – Spend some time away from the city near lots of plants (plants help to clean the air).
  6. – Squeeze half a fresh lemon into room temperature or warm water and drink first thing in the morning to help support the liver.
  7. – Foods that are also good for your liver include turmeric, artichoke, garlic, grapefruit, bitter leafy greens (dandelion, endive, chicory), avocado, green tea, walnuts, cruciferous veggies (cauliflower, broccoli, cabbage, and brussel sprouts), beets, and apples.

Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) also associates the Liver system with other functions in the body, so additionally you could:

  1. – Work on letting go or working out angers, frustrations, and irritabilities.
  2. – Keep your eyes healthy. Follow the 20:20:20 rule. Every 20 minutes, spend 20 seconds looking 20 feet or more away (approximately).
  3. – Stretch! Tendons and ligaments are associated with the Liver according to TCM.
  4. – Keep a regular schedule with meals and sleep, as best as you can. The TCM Liver regulates cycles. Don’t confuse your Liver.
  5. – Exercise. Movement helps the circulation.

Acupuncture, Chinese herbs, supplements (ask me about Quassia), and other treatments and lifestyle changes can also help.

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Lymphatic Support

The lymphatic system is made up of lymphatic vessels, lymph nodes, and lymph fluid. It is part of the circulatory system, delivering nutrients, oxygen, and hormones from the plasma. The lymphatic system also removes excess fluids, pathogens (bacteria, viruses), dead blood cells, cancer cells, waste products, and other toxins from the fluid between the cells.

Sounds important, right? It is! When the lymphatic system isn’t working optimally, we may suffer frequent colds, puffiness, symptoms of toxicity, fatigue, skin problems, and inflammation, amongst other things.

To support the lymphatic system:

  1. – Limit your exposure to toxins. Limit alcohol and processed food consumption.
  2. – Look at your medicine cabinet. Are you taking a lot of medication? Every pharmaceutical has side effects and needs to be processed by the liver. Do not stop any prescribed drugs without advice from your doctor. But, consider that if you are taking acetaminophen (e.g. Tylenol) daily or frequently, this is damaging to your liver.
  3. – Consider that anything you put on your skin will also be absorbed into your body and, if toxic, will affect your health. Though quantities of chemicals might be low, if used regularly, they can accumulate.
  4. – Look at your household cleansers. Does the bottle have a skull and crossbones on it? Consider that there are alternatives, including simple baking soda, vinegar, and lemon combinations and many healthier packages detergents and cleansers on the market.
  5. – Spend some time away from the city near lots of plants (plants help to clean the air).
  6. – Squeeze half a fresh lemon into room temperature or warm water and drink first thing in the morning to help support the liver, and that helps reduce toxins in the body.
  7. – To pump the lymphatic system, try:
    • – Rebounding: jumping up and down on a small trampoline
    • – Alternate hot and cold in the shower
    • – Dry brushing: use a natural bristle brush to brush your whole body, using long strokes, always toward the direction of the heart
  8. – Sweat. Exercise or use a far infrared sauna.
  9. – Drink lots of water, as without sufficient water, lymph fluid cannot flow properly.
  10. – Emphasize green vegetables, essential fatty acids (flax seed oil, hemp seeds oil, chia seed oil), fresh raw nuts and seeds (walnuts, almonds, pumpkin seeds, sunflower seeds), cranberries and unsweetened cranberry juice, broccoli, sweet potatoes, small fatty fish (sardines, herring, mackerel, anchovies).

Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) does not discuss the “lymphatic system” directly, but supporting this system includes supporting the TCM Spleen and Lungs.

  1. – Work on clearing issues of worry, sadness, and grief. Overthinking also weakens the Spleen energies.
  2. – Singing is a great exercise for the Spleen and the Lungs. Enjoy yourself!
  3. – Practice breathing exercises. Deep, slow breaths, whether periodically but regularly or as part of a routine such as in yoga, tai chi, qi gong, or meditation.

Acupuncture, Chinese herbs, supplements (ask me about Lymphdiaral), and other treatments and lifestyle changes can also help.

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